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General Other Website News

Musicians and the Pandemic

Musicians Need Help too

Our hearts go out to anyone suffering from the current virus worldwide. Virus or not, there are always people worse off than any group of people I might mention. Right now musicians are already suffering.

You can help out by listening to their music via streaming platforms like Spotify, Apple Music (iTunes), and Amazon Music. Big name groups probably don’t need help. Instead, try to listen to people who you have not heard before. The artists make money for every song played. Also consider purchasing a track or album. If an artist has a donate button on their website, consider making a donation. Links to get you started are listed below.

If the pandemic continues very long, the economic impact to everyone could be severe. Musicians, at least the lesser known musicians, the truly independent musicians, whether teachers, church musicians, local performers or composers/arrangers are already suffering.

As a church musician, I no longer have a congregation to play for. (We do not have the financial resources or equipment to try and do live services over the internet). It is still up in the air whether I will continue to be paid. If not, nearly 50% of my annual income is gone.

Few musicians perform entirely by themselves. Even a concert pianist has support personnel. Currently there are practically no music performances for live audiences and only the big name performers, who probably don’t need any help can manage concerts via the internet. Most performing and teaching musicians will be unable to effectively do things over the internet.

Teachers can’t teach as effectively via the internet as in live settings. Recording studios, even home studios are no longer operating. And there are many more things negatively impacting musicians.

In my situation thanks to a terrible ISP (AT&T) I have a very, very slow DSL internet connection (never more than 3Mbps!) so what I hear and see is never ideal quality. *BUT IT WORKS* So, while the idea of doing things over the internet is a great ideal, the infrastructure, at least in rural America simply does not exist so far as anything of high quality is concerned.

Here are some links to get you started:
Spotify (Listen for free)

Apple Music (iTunes)

Amazon Music

And of course I can be helped with every piece of sheet music you buy or by taking music lessons over the internet.

Everyone stay safe. Wash your hands often, avoid crowds, don’t go anywhere unless you have to. If you are sick, think you are sick or someone in your household is the same, stay home.

Categories
Arranging Church Music Other Website News

New Free Music available

Free Music

If you didn’t know it, my website has quite a few complete pieces available for download for free. There are also some free titles that would be of use to teachers or students, particularly as related to music theory. Unlike many free products out there, you don’t have to register, you don’t have to give me your email address. Just download what you want.  You’re welcome to click on the donate button found on several of my pages if you’d like to help me stay out of debt.

Click on this link https://jamesgilbertmusic.com/index.php/music-catalog/#free

The original descriptions from when they were sold:

Volume one: AMSTERDAM (Praise The Lord Who Reigns Above) – BLESSED NAME (Blessed Be The Name) – CONVERSE (What A Friend We Have In Jesus) – GALILEE (Jesus Calls Us) – MESSAGE (We’ve A Story To Tell To The Nations) – NEAR THE CROSS – SALVATION – ST THOMAS (I Love Thy Kingdom)- SURRENDER (I surrender all)- WEDLOCK (God Is My Strong Salvation) -Parts are included for treble clef C Bb Eb and F instruments.

Volume 2: AR HYD Y NOS- BRADBURY (Savior Like A Shepherd) – CRIMOND (The Lord’s My Shepherd) – ST DENIO (Immortal Invisible) – WEB (Stand Up For Jesus) – CRUSADER’S HYMN (ST ELIZABETH) (Fairest Lord Jesus; Beautiful Savior) – I AM THINE – MY SAVIOR’S LOVE (I Stand Amazed) – O HOW I LOVE JESUS – PROMISES (Standing on) – RESIGNATION (My Shepherd Will Supply). Parts are provided for treble clef C Bb Eb and F instruments.

Volume 3: AZMON (O For A Thousand Tongues To Sing); CWM RHONDDA (God Of Grace And God Of Glory); TOPLADY (Rock of Ages); JOYFUL SONG (Praise Him Praise Him); GORDON (My Jesus I Love Thee); HENDON (Take My Life And Let It Be); BUNESSAN (Morning Has Broken); LYONS (O Worship The King); PICARDY (Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence); In The Garden; Love Lifted Me. Parts are provided for treble clef C Bb Eb and F instruments.

Enjoy.

Categories
Albums Arranging Other

Very Confused (album track notes)

To continue with my notes on the songs on my 11th album, Sampler, we get to the 6th track. That title is called Very Confused. The description of how I did it may be as equally confusing.

As inspiration for and as a way to try different ways of composing, I took an existing piece, the first movement of the Opus 2, No. 1 Beethoven Piano Sonata. I loaded a midi rendition of the piece into my DAW. I used a function that takes all the notes of the file and extracts them to separate MIDI tracks. I forget how many unique pitches there were, but it was a large number. Based on the visual look of each track in a piano roll editor I moved tracks around and combined many with specific percussion instruments in mind.

I ended up with 16 different midi tracks. Using what I thought would sound good in combination with all the other tracks I assigned various percussion instruments to each of the 16 tracks. All the percussion sounds were from the Native Instruments sound library Percussion Symphony Series. Even the mysterious piano sound was from that library.

Processing, as with much of my music was minimal, once the desired sounds were recorded. The Claves had Replika XT (from Native Instruments) on it with a special effect patch highly modified. The Rain Stick track utilized the Movement plugin (from Output.com), 11.8 pitcher from one of the expansion packs. The vibraslap track sounds like a metalic flying object with lots reverb. That was accomplished by sending it through the Dual Crystals effects chain in Absynth. I used a little bit of EQ and compression here and there.

The original Beethoven Sonata movement, with repeats is nearly 20 minutes long, far too long for a track on the album. So I cut and chopped different sections, mainly silence and shortened it to less than 6 minutes. I was surprised by how much silence there was in the original piece when broken into its individual notes.

It is definitely Very Confused. I hope you like it. If you do or have any other comments or questions, please leave them below.

Categories
Arranging Other Sibelius

Sheet Music Plus for Composers/Arrangers

A “Kindle like” publishing platform for musicians

In case you did not know it, SheetMusicPlus.com has been operating a self-publishing platform similar to the way Amazon allows book authors to publish material for their Kindle.

I’ve been using it since Jan 2016 to sell all the titles I have available and have been quite happy with it. (I also should add that SMP is my go to source for printed music since there are no music stores within driving distance of where I live).

The following article explains it much better than I can and includes some videos to help Sibelius users although anyone who can create a PDF file of their music can participate. Their ArrangeMe option, discussed in the article is a great opportunity for arrangers.

http://www.avidblogs.com/sibelius-users-sell-music-today-millions-worldwide-smp-press/

In addition to Sheet Music Plus, ScoreExchange.com out of England also allows you to sell your music for free. They are very geared toward Sibelius users, allowing them to upload Sibelius files directly to them. I also have many of my titles there, but unfortunately, they are not as well known as SMP. JW Pepper music in the USA has a publish option for composers/arrangers that has a startup fee but also makes titles available to customers in printed form and is geared toward the educational market. I’ve not tried them.

Are there any other similar services I didn’t mention?  Any pros/cons anyone would care to discuss? Please comment.

Categories
Music Theory Other Piano Lessons YouTube Videos

Playing from a Leadsheet (revisited)

Playing from a Leadsheet

for solo pianists

 

Back in 2014 I did a tutorial video on YouTube titles How to play a Leadsheet on solo piano. A followup to it is below.

The video pretty much tells all you need to know to get started playing a leadsheet. One correction is that the D7/F chord on the first line should be a D7/F#. The following description and addition may help in learning to play a leadsheet.

The video shows three different renderings in addition to the original sheet music. The 1st, with just the bass root note in the LH can be a starting point for a walking bass. Imagine a scale based on that root note but not changing any notes from those already in the key signature. Play the 1, 2, 3 & 5 notes or 1,3,5,7 in a measure with one chord. For example, “F G A C” or “C E G B or Bb depending on taste.”

The 2nd sheet music simply shows the block chord with all the notes we could use to harmonize the leadsheet. It is mainly for illustrative purposes. I would never play a leadsheet with just root position block chords.

The final example is the most like one might play. The examples, with the harmony spread between both hands and with rhythmic variation show various rhythmic possibilities for the accompaniment/harmony. However, there’s too much rhythmic variation going on. The last two lines could be played “as is” but the first two lines have, because it is illustrative and not practical, a variety of rhythmic styles.

The next step in leadsheet playing is to listen or look at sheet music of various styles of music similar to the one you are learning. Try and use the rhythmic patterns and harmonic voicing in those examples in your own playing. Leadsheets, after all, are not meant to be a final arrangement. They are there to remind you of how the piece goes and give you just enough information so you can play it such that a listener is reminded of the song.

This is just a starting point to playing from leadsheets.

Bonus points if you recognize what the featured photo shows (besides a leadsheet).

Categories
Arranging Church Music Kindle Organ Music Other Piano Lessons Recordings Website News YouTube Videos

Year 2017 in Review

Goodbye to 2017

To start the blog being moved to this location, I thought I’d start with an article reviewing the past year, 2017, and my musical efforts.

Personally, two things impacted me more than anything else.

First, Hurricane Irma impacted where I live more than other hurricanes in the past have. (I went through Andrew in Miami in 1992 and 3 storms in 2004 here in North Florida). Took probably a month to two to get back to normal. Even now, at least one major highway is impacted due to flooding.

Secondly, I had a USB hub short-circuit or something. It ended up frying the USB ports in my desktop. I had to replace the computer and go through the tedious process of reinstalling software and customizing things to my liking. Of course, the unexpected expense was not welcome.

Most exciting for me (or terrifying I suppose) was one day when I was practicing before my piano students arrived at the church in Micanopy. I saw police go by outside. The short story is that there was a credible bomb threat against two churches in town and a device was found by the propane tanks at the opposite end of the church from where I was. I left the building. A few of my students got to review theory down the street at the library. The crude device would never have gone off let alone caused any serious damage.

Throughout the entire year I released 51 new arrangements or compositions. I performed as a solo pianist three times. Once for a public concert featuring TV & Film music. The other two were for private parties. I played the organ for several funerals this year – more than usual and for at least 3 of them I knew the deceased.

I continue to play for church services at an Episcopal church in Micanopy, FL. It is a good, steady gig at a church that actually sings, sometimes in 4-part harmony, and appreciates music from Gregorian Chant to praise/worship music. (Although they lean more toward the older music than newer).

I continued to coordinate the Concert Series for the above mentioned church. The 2017/2018 series will have 8 concerts, all high-quality performers.

My piano lessons locally and via the internet continued to go well, although I am always wanting more students.

My parent’s cat, featured some years ago in a YouTube video with original music died. He was around 15 years old.

A review of all my music compositions and arrangements follows:

January through March

I released 2 new arrangements and adapted 2 original compositions.
I did one arrangement for a Toronto, Canada church/school for a Reformation celebration.

I’ve also been working with a church in Houston arranging material for their all-volunteer band/orchestra that consists of mostly 12-18 year olds.

Abide With Me — A 12/8 flowing arrangement for solo piano of this familiar piece with large ending. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20407440?aff_id=104230

Was Lebet, Was Schwebet (O Worship The Lord in the Beauty of Holiness) — This was originally a custom arrangement for a Canadian school as they planned to celebrate the anniversary of The Reformation. A hymn accompaniment for Brass Quintet and organ. Suitable for any accompanying of congregational singing. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20407433?aff_id=104230

Missles of October — An original piece, originally for instrumental ensemble. Here adapted for solo piano. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20407445?aff_id=104230

Christ is Made The Sure Foundation — An original piece, originally for choir. Adapted for solo piano. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20441509?aff_id=104230

April through June

During this period I released 19 arrangements or compositions.

All People That On Earth Do Dwell — An unaccompanied setting of All People That On Earth Do Dwell for Soprano, Alto and Tenor or 3-part choir. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20456550?aff_id=104230 Popular Title

BROMLEY (O Trinity Of Blessed Light) — An instrumental hymn accompaniment of this hymn tune. It is intended to be played by any combination of instruments (with keyboard). It consists of two verses of the hymn, each in a different key with a modulation between the two. Parts provided for C, Bb, Eb, F, Alto Clef and Keyboard instruments http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20456546?aff_id=104230

Jesus Keep Me Near The Cross — A contemporary blues, jazz style arrangement of this gospel hymn, Jesus Keep Me Near The Cross. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20456548?aff_id=104230

Amazing Grace, How Sweet The Sound — The popular tune NEW BRITAIN, best known as Amazing Grace here arranged for solo piano. This is a fun, upbeat piece with hints of contemporary and classical music. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20441507?aff_id=104230 Popular Title

Celtic Postlude — When this piece was written, it was popular to have church services that focused on or used Celtic music. This piece is a modern interpretation of an Irish style of music. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20441506?aff_id=104230 Popular Title

Piece in F minor — A piece for concert band in F Minor. An upbeat, almost dance-like piece. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20441502?aff_id=104230

Praise The Lord, Ye Heavens Adore Him    — The hymn tune HYFRYDOL has been set to many different lyrics. Besides this one “Praise The Lord, Ye Heavens Adore Him,” the title “Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus” is well known. This is a fun, upbeat piece to play. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20441508?aff_id=104230

Amazing Grace    — A setting of the hymn tune NEW BRITAIN, best known as Amazing Grace. For Orchestra. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20441503?aff_id=104230 Popular Title

Nearer My God To Thee    — A setting of the hymn tune BETHANY, best known as Nearer My God To Thee. This is the song the band on the ship Titantic played as the ship slowly sank after hitting an iceberg in 1912. For orchestra. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20441504?aff_id=104230 Popular Title

The Star-Spangled Banner — An arrangement of the US national anthem, also known as The Star-Spangled Banner. For Orchestra. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20441505?aff_id=104230

Awesome God — For Woodwind Quintet. A full arrangement of this popular praise and worship piece.  http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20440218?aff_id=104230

Brass    Bridge Over Troubled Water — For Brass Quintet. An arrangement of this popular Simon and Garfunkel tune. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20436729?aff_id=104230 Popular Title

Crazy — For String Quartet. A country, bluesy setting of this piece made popular by Patsy Cline. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20436742?aff_id=104230

Day By Day — For String Quartet. A classical piece in the style of Mozart. Based on the hymn tune BLOTT EN DAG (Day by Day). http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20436745?aff_id=104230 Popular Title

Fairest Lord Jesus — An arrangement for Brass Quintet of this classic hymn. Also known under the title Beautiful Savior. Hymn tune: ST ELIZABETH     http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20436743?aff_id=104230

Halleljuah Chorus (from The Messiah) — A setting of the chorus from The Messiah, for woodwind quintet. A popular, highly requested title, great for any group. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20436751?aff_id=104230 Popular Title

Jesu Joy Of Man’s Desiring (Bach) — For Brass Quintet. This popular piece, often heard at Weddings or Christmas time is from BWV 147. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20436744?aff_id=104230

Prelude in E minor (Chopin) For String Quartet. An arrangement of this popular Chopin piece. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20436747?aff_id=104230

The Sound Of Silence — For Woodwind Quintet. A setting of this popular Paul Simon piece. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20440215?aff_id=104230

July through September

The God Of Abraham Praise — An arrangement of the hymn The God of Abraham Praise for SATB choir with piano accompaniment. Hymn tune name: LEONI. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20520291?aff_id=104230

Waiting and Watching — An original composition for orchestra. A minor, reflective piece. For Orchestra. Many parts are doubled so it can be played with a smaller than average group. Piano reduction provided. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20520293?aff_id=104230

LAUDATE DOMINUM (O Praise Ye The Lord) — An instrumental hymn accompaniment of this hymn tune. This is designed to be played by any combination of instruments with piano. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20520292?aff_id=104230

ST GEORGE’S WINDSOR (Come Ye Thankful People Come) — An instrumental hymn accompaniment of this hymn tune. This is designed to be played by any combination of instruments with piano. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20472175?aff_id=104230

There Is Power In The Blood — A new setting of this favorite gospel hymn. For solo piano. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20472177?aff_id=104230
Popular Title

There Is Power In The Blood — A fun to play arrangement of this audience favorite. For Orchestra. There are many doubled parts in this arrangement which means it can be played and sound just as good without all the listed instruments. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20470069?aff_id=104230
Popular title

A Mighty Fortress — A rhythmic piece inspired by the hymn tune EIN’ FESTE BURG. For orchestra. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20467078?aff_id=104230

Amazing Grace — For Piano Duet. An upbeat, rhythmic setting of this all time favorite hymn. Hymn tune: NEW BRITAIN. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20467079?aff_id=104230
Popular Title

Near The Cross — A blues, jazz setting of this lesser known hymn tune. A fun and very different setting for SATB choir with piano accompaniment. Small choirs can sing the piece in unison or two-parts. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20465376?aff_id=104230

October through December

Once In Royal David’s City — For Solo Organ. A favorite Christmas hymn arranged in a meditative style. Hymn tune: IRBY.

There’s A Voice In The Wilderness — For solo piano. For Advent and Christmas. This arrangement is a majestic and festive setting great for a Postlude or Prelude during Advent. Hymn tune: ASCENSION

Now Thank We All Our God — For Solo Organ. A contemporary, upbeat setting of this hymn. Hymn tune: NUN DANKET

SAGINA (And Can It Be) — For organ accompaniment of congregational singing. Hymn tune: SAGINA. Most common lyrics are to the title “And Can It Be.” Alternate harmonization and descant.

Thou, Who At Thy First Eucharist — For Solo Organ. The melody by Orlando Gibbons in the style of a modern chorale prelude. Hymn tune: SONG 1.

At Calvary — For Woodwind Quintet. This popular hymn arranged for woodwind quintet.  http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20666098?aff_id=104230

I Come With Joy — For solo piano. An arrangement of this popular tune. From the Southern Harmony collection, the hymn tune LAND OF REST is often set to the lyrics of I Come With Joy,  a piece often used for communion. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20666093?aff_id=104230

I Remember You — For Solo Piano. An original composition, arranged and adapted here from the original choral piece. This piece could be appropriate for any spot in a church service, school program or recital. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20666095?aff_id=104230

Irma’s March — An original composition for orchestra. A march like feel, a sense of forward motion throughout. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20666091?aff_id=104230

Kyrie from Missa De Beate Virgine — For Solo Organ. An arrangement of this piece by Josquin Desprez. From one of the earliest Renaissance settings of the Mass. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20666092?aff_id=104230

Rejoice, Ye Pure In Heart — For String Quartet. An arrangement of the popular hymn. Tune name: Marion. A fun, syncopated arrangement. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20666097?aff_id=104230

Amazing Grace — An arrangement of the hymn tune NEW BRITAIN – Amazing Grace – for SATB choir with piano accompaniment.    http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20657604?aff_id=104230

Amazing Grace — For String Quartet. A lively, fun to play setting. Hymn tune: NEW BRITAIN. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20657616?aff_id=104230

Amazing Grace — For Woodwind Quintet. An arrangement of the popular hymn. Hymn tune: NEW BRITAIN. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20657617?aff_id=104230

EVENTIDE (Abide With Me) — An instrumental hymn accompaniment designed to be played by any combination of instruments along with piano (or organ). http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20657609?aff_id=104230

NEW BRITAIN (Amazing Grace) — An instrumental hymn accompaniment designed to be played by any combination of instruments along with piano (or organ). http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20657611?aff_id=104230

NUN KOMM, DER HEIDEN HEILAND (Savior of the Nations, Come) — An instrumental hymn accompaniment designed to be played by any combinatoin of instruments along with piano (or organ). http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20657613?aff_id=104230

SLANE (Be Thou My Vision) — An instrumental hymn accompaniment designed to be played by any combination of instruments along with piano (or organ). http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20657615?aff_id=104230

This Is My Father’s World — For SATB, unaccompanied choir. In addition to rich harmonies, the piece ends with a flowing descant. Hymn tune: TERRA BEATA. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/20657606?aff_id=104230

Please check back often. I plan to be more active with the blog than I was last year.

Categories
Church Music General Other YouTube Videos

Concert Band Arrangements

Sorry it’s been since March (nearly 6 months) since I’ve last posted. As mentioned in the last post, I’ve been doing custom arrangements for a client that’s reached about 10 titles. Plus I’ve been working on series called “Any Size Church Orchestra series” of arrangements for church groups that never know from week to week who will be there. These arrangements, now available at my website, are playable by a wide combination of instruments.

But, today I want to feature my Concert Band arrangements. I will let the demo videos speak for themselves. (Please remember, these are demos from computer software and not mixed. I have neither the time to mix them nor money to hire a real band).

PS. If you’re in the Gainesville, Ocala area on October 16, 2016 I’m giving a solo piano concert featuring TV & Film music. It is at 2pm at the Church of the Mediator in Micanopy, FL.

The following YouTube video is a playlist of demos of all the titles I have.

 

Categories
Arranging Church Music General Other Website News YouTube Videos

Monthly (Mar 2016) post

News

I know I’ve been a bit behind in regular posts here and on my YouTube channel. I probably use Twitter more than anything so if you want to know the latest, follow me there. (@JGSheetMusic).

Arrangements

As mentioned in my last post, I’ve been arranging some copyrighted material for distribution via SheetMusicPlus. I have some new titles available including “Crazy”, “Hawaii Five-O Theme”, “A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square” and “Fly Me To The Moon.” Mostly for solo piano but also a string quartet. Visit my SheetMusicPlus page to see all I have available.

Custom arrangements

I recently finished a custom instrumental arrangement for a church group in the Houston, TX area. The group consists of ages 11-18 with a few adults. This makes a total of four I’ve done for them. They’ve all been well received. I’m available to arrange or compose anything for any combination of instruments or styles. Drop me a note if interested. Here’s a video of the group playing my first arrangement. Remember, they are beginners.

https://youtu.be/9MVXF_Kw7oA

MIDI files

I continue to provide MIDI files for a Lutheran church to use in their services. I send the files over the internet. They hook their computer up to the organ, select the registration they want, hit play and that’s their accompaniment to congregational singing and also some background music during communion. Any midi capable instrument (piano, synthesizer or organ) can be used to play the files.

Website

I continue to post new arrangements and compositions to my website, JamesGilbertMusic.com

Piano Lessons

Of course, I’m still teaching piano lessons locally. I can also teach via the internet if you aren’t in the area.

Church music

Being a church musician is a great way to have a steady gig as a musician. The small, rural parish church I play for had to give up its choir last November due to only 3 or 4 people (all inexperienced, non-musicians) showing up. But for Easter and weeks leading up to it we had some soloists sing in addition to some extra material from me. I offer consultation on how to make the most of your church music program and/or help in accompanying congregational singing – from a single pianist up to a large praise band or orchestra.

Is there anything in the way of tutorials or general information you’d like to see here on this page or my YouTube page.

Categories
Arranging General Other

Where my music is being used

Map of my music usage

Updated Dec 2015. The point in the northeast of Greenland represents all the sales where people did not give their location.

Here’s a map showing where in the world my sheet music has been purchased via my distributor SheetMusicPlus.com. It only covers from March 2014 – October 2015. I plan to update it a few times a year.

Categories
General Other

Piano Concert results

Thanks for those that attended the movie & TV themed concert I did on Oct 25, 2015. The audience request section was more popular than I thought it would be. I got stumped on a couple of requests I didn’t know.This might become a regular/annual part of our concert series. I was able to “stump the audience” a few times with a few pieces nobody could guess. Prizes were handed out to those who could guess the hard ones. In addition to the audience participation sections I played a variety of TV and movie music spanning the years from Casablanca up to more current titles.

Categories
General Other YouTube Videos

Storm aftermath

A little diversion from the usual. We had a little storm go through the area Aug 3, 2015.  It resulted in the flooding of the building shown at the end of the video. The video is at half-speed from its filming. The music is an original composition & recording of mine.

 

Categories
Albums Arranging General Other Reaper Recordings Sibelius Website News

Variegated Plate

Wonder what this might be?

Coming soon...
Coming soon…

var·i·e·gat·ed
ˈver(ē)əˌɡādəd/
adjective
1) exhibiting different colors, especially as irregular patches or streaks.
Botany: (of a plant or foliage) having or consisting of leaves that are edged or patterned in a second color, especially white as well as green.
2) marked by variety.

Think definition number 2. Coming soon…….

Categories
Arranging General Other Reaper

Cubase DAW evaluation

It is always good advice not to switch to a different DAW if you are comfortable and familiar with another one. And, if you aren’t getting the sound you want from the DAW, spend the time learning that DAW before considering switching. Even so, sometimes it’s worth looking at other DAWs if they have a ‘really want’ feature that yours doesn’t or to get ideas of other ways to do things in your current daw.

So I got a copy of Cubase 6 LE as a ‘freebie’ with another product I bought. I know it’s not the latest version of the software nor is it as feature rich as the ‘pro’ version but the midi score editing capability was enough to get me to try it. I also wanted to see the workflow and if the visual is any better than what I’m using. I even watched some tutorial videos so I wouldn’t be completely lost.

I’m not out to start a ‘my DAW is better than yours’ war’. If you like what you use, keep using it. Unless you’re just starting out, you have too much invested to change now.

In my opinion, the workflow of Cubase is more difficult than my current daw. There were a few midi features that were better but not enough reason to switch. The midi music notation editing feature that I most wanted to see was not good. I’ll take PG Music’s Band in a Box (or RealTracks) notation editor over this any day. (For the record, I use Sibelius 7 to create scores then export to midi or play the midi into my daw).

Not that I was seriously considering changing but I will definitely be sticking to my current DAW along with Komplete Ultimate. The DAW I use is the $60 full-featured DAW that even pro-tools professionals have switched to. That is Reaper.

So, Cubase users, any reason I should go back and take another look at it? What is it that made you decide on it rather than something else? Does the latest version have a better interface and workflow than 6?

Categories
General Music Theory Other Piano Lessons

The piano is dead?

Just an article to get the mind thinking. I’d love to hear some insightful comments on this subject.

Are people learning to play the piano enough to keep the piano going as a popular instrument? Is it becoming like the pipe organ or electronic keyboards/synthesizers, all instruments played by a small percentage of musicians?

Is the future of music in technology? Is music moving to the point where one uses a midi controller (either a keyboard like instrument or a drum pad like Maschine) to produce a loop that is then played by pushing a button on a machine or computer (like an iphone/ipad)? Most music heard today by the majority of people is electronic based music. You may love classical music or live music without processing, but that’s the minority. Even if there is a live guitar player, it is unlikely that it hasn’t been processed by something, whether through an electric guitar amp or a foot pedal or computer based effects. Most TV & film music uses electronic samples (recordings) of instruments. Most live performances, like the large big-name touring artists give have pre-recorded elements as part of the performance. Even the voices are manipulated to make the singer stay in tune. One can half-way learn an instrument, record the bits and pieces, manipulate it in a computer and make it sound like a virtuoso. They then go on stage and play that recording – which I give them credit is something they created – while playing very simple parts. Is the need to learn an instrument really necessary?

If you can put together decent sounding material and play it back through a decent sound system while appearing to perform (like a DJ does), is that not sufficient? Over time as you create the raw material you would naturally become more proficient in your instrument. It would take much longer than in traditional lessons, but you’d still learn. Besides, you can rely on the technology to present a product that people like and that’s what matters.

I ask this because my main livelihood is as a piano teacher, apparently a career that is going the way of the dinosaur. I was shown an article in an actual printed paper (Gainesville, FL Sun 1/3/2015 issue) that said that Piano sales are way down and that fewer & fewer parents want their kids to learn piano. The reasons apparently vary between the appeal of learning computers and technology (eg video games) and the, in my opinion, misguided idea that team sports is preferable to music. I’ve lost many a student to sports and it always seems to be the ones that really should stick in music that go off to sports. It makes me wonder if I should switch to teaching how to use drum machines, music notation/composing software, home recording, etc? Would parents or potential students be more interested in that?

I could write volumes on why team sports is not as good for kids in the long run as taking music lessons. I can’t help but think of the quote from “1984” that goes “Films, football, beer, and above all, gambling filled up the horizon of their minds. To keep them in control was not difficult….” I would paraphrase that to say “Entertainment, alcohol, gambling and above all else, sports captured everyone’s attention so controlling and manipulating, misleading, spying on and taking advantage of society was easy.” (Entertainment being things like Films, TV, YouTube, twitter, etc.). But much better authors than me have pointed out the fallacies of focusing on sports for children. Unfortunately, the parents making the decisions about music lessons don’t listen or don’t care about those facts.

Even if sports were not a big distraction for children & parents, would the side of technology that makes it far to easy to produce music that sounds good be sufficient reason for people not to take serious music lessons? What should a piano or music teacher do if the field of learning a specific instrument is dead or dying?

Comments, ideas? Please share.

Categories
Arranging General Other YouTube Videos

My first look at Komplete Kontrol

Komplete Control is software that allows Komplete 9 & Komplete 10 users the ability to find sounds in one central location.

So, I just got it and put together a video showing some of its main features.

See the video

Subscribe to me on YouTube to keep up with my latest videos like this.

 

Categories
Albums General Other

How do you listen to music

Please let me know in the comments or on twitter how you listen to music.

Listening to music

Why I’m asking this question.
I noticed in my collection of computer “junk” that I had a speaker system of a powered sub-woofer and three speakers. They were from a 2006 era computer. The sub-woofer is good, but the other speakers are not high-quality. I couldn’t remember why I wasn’t using them with my current system other than I have some nice near-field monitors. (But they don’t do low end well).

I hooked the system up and they sounded nice. The low end was a dramatic improvement over my current setup. But, after about 20 minutes the speakers started crackling and making a lot of static. Due to the unique (proprietary?) way the sub-woofer connects to the other speakers, I can find no way to use the sub-woofer without them. So, I’m back to just my near-field monitors and good over-the-ear headphones for listening and mixing.

I really liked hearing the low end in the music I was working on. I would like to get the sub-woofer to work with different speakers, but I can’t. This all got me to thinking, how do you and people you know listen to music? Is a sub-woofer commonly used?

Few listen to live non-amplified music

Most people will listen to music via some sort of speaker/amplifier system. Unless you regularly go to live performances of non-amplified instruments – which I do recommend – then you are listening to music via a speaker. I’d like to know what type of speakers you listen on. No, I don’t want to know models or brands, just general information. You may listen in various locations. I want to know what the most common speaker setup is for you.

Speaker listening possibilities

Here are some possibilities. Do you listen only in your vehicle? Do you only use ear-buds? Do you use the computer speakers that are in your laptop? What about over the ear headphones? Do you use the speakers that came with your computer desktop? Do you listen to the speaker of your phone or tablet? Do you listen through a home stereo or home theater system? When listening on stand-alone speakers are the largest speakers big (10 inches or more)? Are there multiple speakers within the speaker cabinet? Or maybe you listen via some other speaker setup?

To sub-woofer or not?

What about a sub-woofer? Do you listen to most of your music via a system that has a sub-woofer? (That’s the ‘point 1’ in a 5.1 or 7.1 system). What do you think of your music when you have to listen on a system without one? When I record or mix music, should I assume most people don’t listen on a system with a sub-woofer and not worry about mixing so it sounds excellent on a system with one? Although I try to mix so my music sounds good on all systems, I’m wondering as a result of this experience whether I need to spend so much time trying to perfect the sound for all systems or focus on the ones that most people listen to? Of course I’ll always strive to sound better on as many speakers as I can, I could save time by not spending so much time working on trying to please all speakers out there.

Any thoughts or comments are welcome here or via my Twitter account @JGSheetMusic

Visit my website JamesGilbertMusic.com for details about my sheet-music, recordings, piano lessons and more.

Categories
Other Website News

Social Links

I have a few of the social networks I’m part of as ‘widgets’ on my page, but it doesn’t make sense to clutter up the blog with all those links. With the recommendation of several people, I’ve joined even more networks lately and thought I’d list them here for you. A few I’ve only just got started with, so bear with me if things are a bit bare on some of them.

Of course, where everything I do can be found in one place is my website: JamesGilbertMusic.com

YouTube – tutorial videos and music videos

SoundCloud – Audio tracks, some unique to soundcloud, others from my albums and more

Please feel free to follow, like, join, pin or whatever the term is you do for each one. I really don’t care if I have thousands of followers, but it would be nice to have some. What I’d really like is more comments, replies and interaction on any or all of these sites.

Categories
Albums Arranging Other Piano Lessons Reaper YouTube Videos

Summertime (2014)

Summertime

It’s always slow in the music world in the summer, at least for me. Everyone’s out and about and the last thing they want to do is buy sheet music. I guess most people don’t buy CD’s to begin with, but even digital music (MP3) slows down in the summer. Even my piano students like to take off and disappear for a few weeks or even months. So, I’ve not had much to talk about in the blog.

The music workshop I talked about (see earlier post) came and went. I couldn’t get very many people to attend. Apparently, after the fact, everyone who should have told me, now decides to tell me that “oh, you need to start publicity & sign up way back in April.” Thanks for the help then. Not knowing any better, I started publicity in late May. Even with so much advance time, almost 2 months, I still couldn’t get the teens to come. As to the course, everything went quite well. It being a computer music workshop, the potential for technical issues was great. We had none. There were some issues with one person not having installed one of the software titles I required, but the next day they had done so.

Latest activity since May:

All 9 of my CD albums are now available in physical format in addition to mp3 or FLACC format.

If you don’t follow me on my SoundCloud page, please do. I’ve posted quite a few short pieces in a variety of styles. And go back and listen to previous tracks.

In addition to selling sheet music on my website, I’ve also partnered with Sheet Music Plus digital to sell selected titles on their digital download site. They are my go-to site if I need printed sheet music.

My YouTube channel has a few new tutorial videos about Battery 4 & Reaper as well as an introductory look at the new SampleTank 3.

Of course, Spotify, which has an absolutely free version and lets you choose what you want to listen to (unlike Pandora, right?), all of my albums are there. I hope to have a new album or two out later this year.

If you are at all interested in piano lessons from me over the internet, please get in touch via the website, JamesGilbertMusic.com. (I also teach composition, arranging, music software tutoring, etc. on any schedule or frequency you like).  Of course, I also continue to teach lessons locally (near Gainesville & Ocala, Florida).

Any suggestions for content here or on YouTube or SoundCloud or what type of music to put on my next album(s), drop me a note.

Thanks to those that subscribe and to all that read.

 

Categories
Albums Arranging Church Music Organ Music Other

SheetMusicPlus Digital

For those who may not know this, SheetMusicPlus – an online distributor of printed sheet music – is also selling music digitally. As a composer/arranger, they allow me to submit material to be published digitally. I get the impression they prefer original material rather than your new typesetting of a public domain title. From the customer standpoint, one can either print out a copy or use an app for a tablet. Apparently they only have an app for the iPad and not Android devices.

I’m happy to announce that I now have about 50 titles (collections) available for purchase on the SheetMusicPlus digital download site:

JamesGilbertMusic.com music on SheetMusicPlus

Update 2020: I have about 1,000 titles on the site now.

You’ll find Choral, Organ, Piano, Handchime and Handbell titles. The organ music includes solo material and hymn accompaniments.

Of course, I’d like it more if you bought material straight from my website (and the website has more content and no DRM restrictions like their site). I also have free titles available at my website

You may find obtaining my music via this new service easier or better for you than my website. Either way, I encourage you to check out the listings at either location and please spread the word about my music.

My recordings can be found on AmazonMusic iTunes, Spotify

Categories
Albums Other Website News

Request and New Album announcement

Another album?

I know someone reading this is saying, hold on, another album? Didn’t you just release a Christmas one last October (2013) and an EDM one in Dec 2013? Yes, I did. And I’ve got another one out now and will probably have a couple more out this year (2014).  Unlike a lot of artists, I’m not stuck in any one musical style. Maybe I should be, but I’m not. Plus, I’ve never met a woman rich enough for me to want to marry, so my time is pretty much all mine. I spend that time composing, arranging, recording, mixing and releasing albums. This new album is different than the others.

A Request

I don’t expect everyone who reads this blog to rush out and buy one of my albums, but it would be nice. Different people have different tastes, so not everything I record will appeal to everyone. If you have bought an album or listened to them online, may I encourage you, beg? you to write a comment about my music? Please? Pretty please??  The nicer the comment, the better, but really any comment would be welcome.

You can search for my name on iTunes, Amazon, Spotify, rdio, Rhapsody, etc. and enter comments there.

I’ve had many requests from people I meet for physical CD’s. They either don’t know how downloads work or prefer the physical format. So, I’m in the process of getting all my albums into physical format. For the time being, I’m going with professionally printed and duplicated CD-R rather than the expensive ‘replication’ or ‘glass pressing’ that you might typically buy from a major label. I’ve yet to find any CD player that can’t play them and shelf life isn’t that much different.

I Won’t Give Up

That is the title of my latest album, available now in digital format and soon in physical format. I’ll have a new entry here that goes into details about that album. In the meanwhile, you can check it out at the link above or listen to it on Spotify.

Categories
Albums Arranging General Other Sibelius YouTube Videos

Sibelius 101 Video tutorial series

Sibelius 101 video tutorial series

I’m sorry I’ve not posted anything in over a month. I’ve been busy with a few new projects. Check out my Soundcloud page:

http://soundcloud.com/jamesgilbertmusic

Among other things I’ve been working on a new video tutorial series for those new to or inexperienced with Sibelius 7. I’m calling it Sibelius 101. I’m trying to keep the videos short and faster paced so you don’t have to spend too much time on any single video. Rather than go through every feature, I’m focusing on the options that will help you get things done in as efficient manner as possible. I’m also showing tips and practical ways of doing things.

View the videos at this YouTube playlist.

Part 1 covers the basics of Sibelius with regards to setting up the program and where to find things that you may want to adjust to your like.

http://youtu.be/REF0j7BOM40

Part 2 covers basic note entry. How do you get notes into Sibelius. Several ways of entering notes in step-time is shown. Mouse entry, computer keyboard entry and midi/external keyboard input.

http://youtu.be/mjED2JZgccI

Part 3 covers real-time entry and basic note editing. How to use your midi keyboard to enter notes is shown. Some tips for cleaning up your played notes are shown too.

http://youtu.be/3ZKl5hydpsQ

Part 4, 5 & 6 cover various topics about editing your notes once you get it into Sibelius. I talk about how to use voices including converting existing voices to other voices, copying and pasting notes, adding intervals above and below existing notes and more.

http://youtu.be/l0vi1Ugmd_A
http://youtu.be/7TbvGt3ZS0s
http://youtu.be/UenxdqmeJxY

The whole series is now available – 11 parts in all – see the Playlist at the top of this page to view the other 5 videos. You can also visit our YouTube Channel to see all the videos. I also have separate videos about other Sibelius topics available on the YouTube site. 

If you’ve not visited our website, please do:

http://jamesgilbertmusic.com

If you’d like to listen to my albums – I now have 8 available – listen to them on Spotify

Update 2020, I now have 13 albums available everywhere digital music is available.

Categories
Albums Arranging General Other

I Loved It

What’s the Monty Python saying? “And now for something completely different?”

Cover art from the album
Cover art from the album

Introducing our 8th album to be released – “I Loved It”.  This album is quite a departure from our previous albums. This album is an EDM (Electronic Dance Music), dance and related styles album. The titles are very upbeat, danceable tunes.  Most of them are extended length tracks with a few being 7 minutes or longer. Track list:

  • I Loved It
  • Crashing My Party
  • Maybe Call Me
  • Best Songs (inspired by Bach’s Airoso)
  • Just The Kiss
  • Treasures
  • Rising To Me
  • I Can Wait
  • I Needed Your Love

Listen to a sample of all titles on Soundcloud here

The full album can be listened to on Spotify and other streaming services.

We hope you enjoy it. Please like or comment on it at your favorite music sites.

Categories
Arranging Church Music General Organ Music Other Website News

Latest Additions to the Music Catalog (11/2013)

Here is a list of additions to the JamesGilbertMusic.com music catalog since the last listing of new titles.

We hope you will find these helpful. If you are looking for a specific arrangement of a piece of music or need midi files created for you, please contact us for details.

Fairest Lord Jesus (Woodwind Quintet)
A nice simple setting of this classic hymn also known under the title Beautiful Savior. Hymn tune: ST ELIZABETH. Instrumentation: Standard Woodwind Quintet (Flute – Oboe – Clarinet – Horn – Bassoon). Settings of this tune for Piano – Organ – Keyboard Trio and Orchestra are also available in this catalog.

Count Your Blessings (Keyboard Trio)
A catchy version of this gospel hymn for Keyboard Trio. Written with three synthesizers in mind this title can be used with various combinations of piano organ and electronic keyboards (synthesizers). A setting of this for solo instruments and orchestra is also available.

O Love, How Deep, How Broad (Organ)
An ornamented setting of this hymn tune DEUS TUORUM MILITUM. This will make for a great prelude or communion piece.

12-Tone Composition for 4 instruments (Instrumental Ensemble)
An example of a 12-tone (dodecaphonic) composition. This is for 4 instruments, any 4 instruments. Parts provided for C Bb Eb F and Alto clef instruments.

What Child Is This (Piano)
An arrangement for intermediate level of the popular tune GREENSLEEVES, best known as the Christmas piece What Child Is This? A setting of this title for orchestra is also available. The orchestra version was featured on my Christmas Album A New Old Christmas

What Child Is This (Orchestra)
An arrangement of the popular tune GREENSLEEVES, best known as the Christmas piece What Child Is This? This orchestra arrangement is also available for solo piano. Instrumentation: Flute Oboe Clarinet French Horn Trumpet Trombone Timpani Violin 1 Violin 2 Viola Cello Bass. This title was featured on my Christmas album A New Old Christmas

Nicene Creed (Modern Version) (Vocal/Choir/Congregation)
A setting of the Nicene Creed, modern translation. Designed for congregational use, this title can be use by a choir as well. For unison voices. This has been successfully used in church services.

BEECHER to HYFRYDOL (Love Divine, All Loves Excelling) (Organ Accompaniment)
A modulation from Bb to F and transition from the hymn tune BEECHER to the hymn tune HYFRYDOL. Try this with the first two verses of Love Divine, All Loves Excelling to BEECHER, the interlude, then the last two verses to the tune HYFRYDOL. Works quite well. For use with congregational singing.

Meditation on LLEDROD (Spirit Of God Unleashed) (Organ)
A meditation on this traditional Welsh tune from the 1850’s. A good prelude or communion piece.

Meditation on BLAENHAFREN (Organ)
A meditation on this Welsh hymn tune.

Moment By Moment (Instrumental Solo)
An adaptation of the flute duet found elsewhere in the catalog. This setting is for solo flute (or any treble clef instrument) and organ accompaniment. The organ part is easily adapted to be played on the piano. Parts provided for high and low C instruments Eb treble clef and Bb treble clef instruments. The following instruments would work well with this piece: Flute, Violin, Oboe, Recorder, Bb Trumpet Bb Clarinet Tenor Saxophone Alto Saxophone Eb Clarinet.

Hallelujah Chorus from Messiah (Handel) (Choir)
Probably the best known choral piece written. The Hallelujah Chorus from Messiah by G.F. Handel. For SATB (Soprano Alto Tenor and Bass voices) with piano accompaniment.

Love Lifted Me (Instrumental Descant)
An instrumental descant for this upbeat gospel hymn. Parts provided for C Bb Eb F and Alto Clef Treble Clef instruments.

In The Garden (Instrumental Descant)
An instrumental descant for this all time favorite gospel hymn. Parts provided for C Bb Eb F and Alto Clef Treble Clef instruments.

Christmas Meditation (Orchestra)
A setting of some traditional Christmas music with some original material. A setting for solo instrument with piano is also available in the catalog. Instrumentation: Flute Oboe Clarinet French Horn Trumpet Trombone Violins Viola Cello Double Bass Harp Timpani and Glockenspiel. The harp part can be played on piano.

YouTube Tutorial (Orchestra)
A short orchestra piece written for a YouTube tutorial about using Sibelius. Visit my YouTube channel for an audio sample. Instrumentation: Flute Oboe Clarinet Trumpets (3) Trombones (2) Violin (1) Cello (1).

New Gigue (Organ)
An original composition. A modern twist on the Gigue.

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Categories
General Other

iPad music apps – revisited

iPad music apps revisited

If you have some time, please listen to my music on iTunes (Click here)

One of the most popular articles I’ve written here on my blog has been about sheet music apps for the iPad. I wanted to do a followup letting people know what I’ve found most useful and what I use regularly for music in general.

forScore

This is my go to app. For viewing sheet music, this is the one. As a performing musician called upon to perform from sheet music and someone who plays far too many different titles to memorize everything, I need something to display my sheet music. This program is the hands down winner. The latest version (compatible with iOS7) adds some nice features. The only complaint I have is they have implemented non-standard html in their ‘console’ interface that allows you to manipulate your score database via your desktop browser. It won’t work with Windows 7 & the latest Chrome browser.  (Let’s face it, doing anything that requires typing on the iPad is a futile effort, particularly if you touch type).

MIDI related apps

One comment. I think the iPad has a long way to go before it can be considered a content creation device. It’s great for consuming content, but terrible for making it. If you have no choice but to make your creation of music recordings “on the go”, then you really have no choice. For me, it takes three or four times longer to do the same on the iPad, if I can do it at all, as it does on my home PC. Maybe, just maybe someone who has never used anything but the iPad can do it fast, but I doubt it. One also has little choice but to by external (expensive) hardware to use with the iPad in order to make it possible to do any creating of content. In that case, I might as well buy a laptop. And let’s not even talk about the terrible speaker that comes with the iPad. (I know, use headphones, but that’s just something else to have to carry and/or buy).

iRig MIDI – This program requires the over-priced iRig MIDI hardware interface that often slips out of the iPad. Good if you need to hook up an external midi device to your ipad (for playing in or playing out). Complaint, the app isn’t very good. You can’t transfer midi files from your computer to the app. Many midi files I’ve created and then transferred to my computer cannot be read by any software I own. But, when I play them directly into my computer and record them into those same software programs, it records just fine (but takes 10 times as long to do). ikMultimedia won’t fix the problem.

TouchOSC – I’m disappointed with this. I loved playing with it when I first got it, but 99% of the time, I don’t use it. I perform on an acoustic piano or organ so I have no need for using it live. When it comes to studio based production, I can do everything as efficiently using the computer mouse and keyboard. I never used a midi controller prior to having this, so maybe it’s just that I’m not use to controllers. If you are, then, given the very expensive price of the iPad, it makes sense to use it as a hardware controller rather than buying one. So for that, it’s good. For entering midi notes (like a pianist would on a regular synthesizer), forget it, you’ll be frustrated.

SampleTankFree – I’m told that professionals use it (and it’s paid cousin) to make tracks that go straight to albums or they export to a DAW. For me, it’s too toy or game-like and very limited to do anything serious with. I know the free version is a teaser for the paid version, but frankly, it’s not done the job. If you are never at home and never able to use a midi keyboard or computer to enter your music, then this might, just might work while you are away from them.

Piano Lesson or Educational software

I like the following. They all have their pluses and minuses.

Pitch Invasion (ear training)
QF Notes (note flash cards)
Dust Buster (for new piano students, young students)
PlainText (a plain notepad for entering notes about students or anything).

Other software worth mentioning

WavePad (basic audio recorder)
unrealBook (another notation program. Good for leadsheets)
dbVolume (a SPL db meter to tell you how loud things are)
TraktorDJ (lookup Traktor on the native instruments website. DJ software)

Software I have my eye on

NotateMe – Supposedly allows you to hand-write your music on the iPad and then transfer to your computer for importing into Sibeliius or Finale.

Thanks for reading. Please comment and let me know what you’re using.

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Any advertisements placed on this page have no affiliation with this blog. Personally, I never click on ads I see on a blog.

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Categories
Arranging Other Website News

A New Old Christmas album now available

My new album A New Old Christmas is now available. See my previous post for additional details.

The album consists of familiar carols and holiday favorites set in some new ways. It contains a variety of styles so there is sure to have titles that everyone will like. This would be a good album for the family to pop into the CD player or a new tablet or sound system on Christmas and enjoy.

This album is a full-blown CD available in digital format and in physical format. It will also be available on Amazon, iTunes and more. It can also be listened to on Spotify, Rhapsody and other music streaming sites.

Please let everyone you known as well as friends and family about the album. I could use all the help I can get to publicize this album. The album contents:

  • Christmas Meditation
  • Away In A Manger
  • O Come, O Come Emmanuel
  • Jingle Bells
  • A Classical Christmas Piece
  • Joy To The World
  • What Child Is This
  • Christmas Medley
  • We Wish You A Merry Christmas
  • About the making of We Wish You A Merry Christmas
  • Christmas Medley Electronic version (Bonus)