About my latest YouTube video – Sibelius 7 tips

Sibelius tips

I’ve uploaded a new tutorial video to YouTube. This one is about some tips I’ve found that help my workflow when using Sibelius. Geared toward Sibelius 7, it can be adapted to use with earlier versions.

Highlights

Advanced filtering.

Have you discovered the power of advanced filtering? An example is shown.

Preferences.

There are many preferences to choose from. This video shows how to turn off the startup sound, ease the strain on your system of the playback configurations (which seem to be more system demanding in version 7 than before). A discussion of keyboard shortcuts. Almost every task you can do in Sibelius can have a keyboard shortcut assigned to it and more.

Voices and editing music in different voices

Do you know how to take an existing part and copy it into voice 2 in another staff that already has voice 1 notes? You can’t just cut and paste. See how.

Wildcards

There are many wildcards that can be used when working with text. See how to incorporate them into your titles/composers and how you might use them in footnotes.

Parts

Making the layout of your parts look consistent among parts, including editing text styles to change the position in the parts, but leave it where it was in the score. Hiding text in the parts but keeping it in the score.

Ribbon tips

You either love it, hate it or tolerate it, but the Ribbon is here to stay. How to gain back some screen real estate and some different ways to view your music.

Take a look at it:

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OouCZ-Uz0zM?hl=en&fs=1]

Please leave some feedback on the YouTube site or here.

Using pre-1611 music

The title page to the 1611 first edition of th...
Image via Wikipedia

Pre-1611 music service

On November 20, 2011 the Church of the Mediator Episcopal church in Micanopy, FL ( held a service that focused on the 400th Anniversary of the King James Version of the Bible. To try and keep the service as much musically like what people may have heard in 1611, we tried to select appropriate music.

The scripture was, of course, from the King James version. We used the original edition, complete with the different spellings used in 1611.

Hymns

In researching hymn tunes and lyrics that were written prior to 1611, we discovered that few English language hymns exist. It was about 100 years later that English language hymnody really took off with such authors as Isaac Watts. Although there are numerous foreign language pieces (eg. German) that were possibilities, but the translations, such as A Mighty Fortress, were written long after 1611 so we did not use those titles.

We could only find about 7 hymns that would work. Of those, the following were chosen. Even with these, some of the translations or harmonizations were done after 1611.

  • Jerusalem, My Happy Home (Tune: Diana)
  • Psalm 23 metrical version (Tune: St. Flavian)
  • The Lord Descended from above (Tune: Moravian)
  • All People That On Earth Do Dwell (Tune: Old 100th)
  • I Call On Thee, Lord Jesus (Tune: Ich Ruf Zu Dir)

The hymn I Call on Thee was written by Miles Coverdale (1487-1568) who is probably best known for his Coverdale Psalms, a translation of Psalms. The hymn tune dates to 1533 but was harmonized in 1928. It is found in the 1982 Episcopal Hymnal as hymn 634.

All People That On Earth Do Dwell is set to the tune Old 100th, best known to many as the Doxology. The words by William Keth (d. ~1608) and is a paraphrase of Psalm 100. In this case, the lyrics and music are all written pre-1611. The music is from 1551 and harmonized prior to 1561. This is probably the oldest hymn with lyrics and music commonly used by congregations today.

Jerusalem, My Happy Home was written in the 16th century. The melody, tune: Diana, is a traditional English melody from the 16th century. The setting we used was harmonized in 1939.

The metrical Psalm setting of Psalm 23 we used was to the tune St. Flavian, sung often to the lyrics Lord, Who Throughout These Forty Days. This tune dates from 1562.

The Lord Descended From Above is another Sternhold Psalm. The tune is Moravian from pre-1611. The edition we used was from an 1882 Church of Christ/Presbyterian hymnal.

Organ Music

Presbyterian Church, now Episcopal Church of t...
Image via Wikipedia

I do not have access to any original edition organ publications pre-1611. I did have several arrangements or adaptations of pre-1611 organ music.

For pre-service music, I played the following:

  • Pavane, by William Byrd
  • Salmodia para el Magnificant by Antonio de Cabezon, arranged by E. Power Biggs
  • Dialogo per Organo by Adriano Banchieri, arranged by E. Power Biggs
  • St. Flavian (tune)

During communion I played the following titles. In the E. Power Biggs edition I had, they were grouped together as one piece, in two sections:

  • 1. Pavana – The Earle of Salisbury from Parthenia or The Maydenhead (1611) by William Byrd
  • 2. Galiardo also from Parthenia or The Maydenhead (1611) by William Byrd
The Pavana in this piece is the same as the pre-service piece, but arranged quite differently. I suspect, but have no way to know, that this edition is more accurate to the original.
For the postlude I played Ayre of Four Parts by John Dowland.
(Added 11/21)
If you’d like to see the sermon that focuses on the KJV, visit:

The Cat

New Video

I’ve uploaded a new video to YouTube.

The soundtrack is an original piece originally written as a school assignment (years ago) to accompany a section of a cartoon. It has since undergone some revision. The music was written for Flutes (including Alto), Saxophones, French Horn, Trumpets, Guitar, Electric bass, drums and piano. The somewhat odd instrumentation was due to the requirement’s of the school assignment.

The music was originally written using MusicPrinter+ (anyone remember that?), Finale (97?), then converted to Sibelius 6, then Sibelius 7.

The recording of the music used the Reaper DAW for recording & mixing. I used a few Native Instruments products (Kontakt 4, Komplete 7) and built in effects in reaper.

The video part shows some still images put together to make a video of the day in the life of The Cat. The video portion is not as important as the music.
[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njgeW8iHrsE]
The sheet music and a full mp3 recording can be found at JamesGilbertMusic.com

Questions or comments? Drop us a note.

New MP3 recordings at the website

Two new mp3 audio recordings have been added to the music catalog.

Chord Flavors

The first, Chord Flavors, is a recording of the original composition Chord Flavors. It is a flowing, rhythmic transition between various chords. This transition and interplay of chords ends up making for a nice melody as well. If you’ve followed any of the chord tutorial series on YouTube, this is a good example of what you can do with little more than a progression of chords.

For the recording, the G-flat Group used software based synthesizers to do the recording. The piece used only 3 instruments, a patch in Massive, a patch in Absynth and an instrument in Reaktor that was created by feeding the audio of the first two instruments into Reaktor.

Read more and listen to an audio sample.

Run Away From The Island

The second piece, Run Away From The Island is a recording by The Emotive Players. It was made from a piece written specifically for the recording. The sheet music to this title will soon be in the catalog, and may be by the time you read this. It is a high-paced, percussive piece implying action and movement. Instruments used include Massive, Evolve Mutations 2 and Studio Strings Pro. A fun little piece. See our YouTube channel where this music is used as the soundtrack to a short slideshow video.

The piece is based on a 12-tone row. The row is formed in such a way that it is not too atonal. The piece is melodic, but it is more percussive than melodic. The use of the animator feature in Studio Strings Pro gives the piece some real sense of motion. The Evolve Mutations patches add a depth to the percussive nature of the piece.

Listen to an audio sample

The recordings were mixed in Reaper. The sheet music used to generate MIDI files for some tracks was done in Sibelius 7.

We hope you enjoy these and please let your friends know about them.